A Level History

History at A level is consistently one of the most popular choices for students studying A levels at Polesworth.

There is no need to have studied History at GCSE in order to do A level. The periods studied are completely different and no knowledge is required. So if you couldn’t take History at GCSE because of limited options you will be more than welcome at A level.

Results are consistently good and students enjoy their lessons which are all taught by a team of fully qualified, experienced A’ level teachers.

Sarah Moss, who has just completed her studies gaining a grade A, said of her time studying history:
“I feel privileged to have been asked to write a few lines about the study of history at Polesworth, but disappointed that I haven’t been asked to write 3000 words, such was my enthusiasm for the subject that I could never stop writing!

History at Polesworth gave me the opportunity to develop and extend my interests in the subject across a broad spectrum of topics and approaches. The programme takes maximum advantage of a range and breadth of different fields, covering both European and British History, within which I gained insight into many different themes including, political, social, economic and cultural aspects. The course offers the chance of an in-depth study, which allowed me to conduct independent research into a particular topic of interest to me, which in my opinion, was a key part of the learning experience that I acquired during my time at Polesworth.

I was taught and advised by staff at the very cutting edge of their subjects, who expressed enthusiasm and passion for their subject which inspired me to take my interest in history further, and thanks to the fantastic teaching and support I received from the History department at Polesworth I am a few weeks into reading for a degree in the subject at Manchester University. I am sure that everybody studying History at Polesworth will experience a rewarding two years of enjoyable study and excellent teaching.”

A Level Results

Year

 

A*

A

B

C

D

E

N

U

Total

A*-B%

A-C%

A-E%

2014

1

4

16

21

6

0

0

0

48

44%

88%

100%

2013

1

2

15

16

12

6

1

53

34%

64%

98%

2012

0

2

22

15

5

1

0

0

45

53%

87%

100%

2011

3

9

15

14

5

0

0

0

46

57%

89%

100%

2010

1

7

14

18

6

1

1

48

46%

83%

98%

 

What you will study

From September 2015, following the introduction of new A Levels, we will be following a new programme of study.
At the moment we are intending to follow the following programme from OCR:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/Images/170128-specification-accredited-a-level-gce-history-a-h505.pdf

Unit One – England 1199–1272.

We begin this exciting time in English History by studying the ‘evil’ King John and discover that this view of him is highly debatable.  The fact is that much of the evidence that remains about him was written by monks at a time when he was in conflict with the Church.

We look at the Civil War between John and the Barons that led to the Magna Carta. From this we look at the rule of Henry II and the second Civil War between the Monarchy and the Barons.

This was a period that shaped the nature of the Middle Ages and indeed still influences how our country works today, and the rights we enjoy.

Unit Two -The Cold War in Europe 1941- 1995

In Unit two we come up to date and look at the events that shaped the world we have now.

We begin by looking at relations between the Soviet Union and the West during the World War II and then move on to look at how relations deteriorated, taking the World to the brink of nuclear Armageddon.

We will study the building and the destruction of the Berlin wall, crises in Hungary, Poland and Czechoslovakia, the space race and the final collapse of Communism in the East.

The Berlin Airlift. The Soviet Union blockaded Berlin so No food or resources could get in or out. The Allies resupplied Berlin by air, a dramatic moment when the world was on the brink of war.

Unit Three – Tudor Rebellions.

As a contrast to the other two units we will examine the Tudors and their relationships with the people they ruled, and why they faced so many rebellions.  We will discover why rebellions declined and England became a more peaceful place. As we study this period we will look at the dynastic challenges to the Tudors from people such as Mary Queen of Scots, challenges to the religious changes of Henry VIII and Elizabeth I and threats from abroad.

The Pilgrimage of Grace 1536. 35,000 rebels in the North of England rose against Henry VIII – learn how only Henry’s deviousness saved him.

Unit 4 – Coursework.

In addition the course will give you the opportunity to look into one area of history in more depth. The coursework will consist of 3000-4000 words and be focused on a topic that you choose after consultation with your teacher. This could be a more detailed look at one aspect of history studied in one of the other units or growing from that unit, for example the Cuban Missile Crisis, the Vietnam War, the Spanish Armada, Mary Queen of Scots or Magna Carta. Alternatively you could choose to study a topic not covered in the course such as the Suffragettes or Hitler’s Germany.

This is a broad course with elements that should be interesting to anyone with an interest in History. For more details speak to your History teacher or any of us in the department.